Character Sketch of Hori of Godan


Character Sketch of Hori of Godan
Hori is an immortal character of Munshi Premchand. He is the protagonist of the novel Godan. He is a complex and compelling character. He embodies the struggles and aspirations of the common man in rural India during the early 20th century. Through this character the novelist explores themes of social inequality, poverty, and the plight of the Indian peasantry.
Hori is a hardworking and diligent small farmer. He has a deep desire to own a cow. He represents the aspirations of countless peasants who dream of escaping the cycle of poverty and improving their social standing. Hori's relentless pursuit of acquiring cow becomes a metaphor for his quest for dignity and self-worth.
Hori is married to Dhania. He has two daughters, Sona and Rupa. He has a son named Gobar. Hori is an up-righteous man. He struggles throughout his life to preserve his up-righteousness. He has two younger brothers. He considers his obligation as the eldest brother to help them.
Despite his earnest efforts Hori faces numerous challenges and setbacks throughout his life. He is trapped in a web of exploitation. The moneylender takes advantage of his financial vulnerabilities. He pushes him into a ditch of never ending debt. Even the members of his family often display ingratitude. They take him for granted. They undermine his aspirations.
Hori faces harsh realities of his existence. Despite this he remains optimistic. He holds onto his dreams. His unyielding determination and his ability to find solace in small joys demonstrate his unwavering spirit.
Hori's transformation throughout the novel is also noteworthy. In the beginning the novelist has portrayed him as a naive and trusting individual. However, as the story progresses, he becomes increasingly aware of the injustices and inequalities in society. This awareness fuels his desire to break the shackles of poverty and societal constraints.
The character of Hori reflects the author's social commentary on the prevalent caste system and the exploitative relationship between the rich and the poor. Hori belongs to the lower caste. He is constantly reminded of his social position. He faces discrimination at various instances.
In short, Hori is a multi-dimensional character. He represents the aspirations, struggles, and resilience of the Indian peasantry. Premchand masterfully captures the social and economic complexities of rural India of his days. Through the character of Hori the novelist presents a scathing critique of the prevailing social hierarchies and exploitation. Hori's character remains timeless.

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